Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Garden Journal, volume 3 issue 1

So what if there is still 6+ inches of snow on the ground? It finally getting up into the lower 40's, the sun feels strong, so I planted the first round of seeds in the greenhouse. This was Lucy's third year of helping in the garden. The first year she just sat in her excersaucer and ate onion stems. The second year she dug holes in the beds with her shovel and dumped the dirt in the pathways. This year she actually helped plant the seeds. I helped her plant a whole pot of onions, then she got to cover the seeds with dirt, water it, then put the pot up in the greenhouse.


I think she liked it. I'm going to take her out every few days to show her the progress of the seeds, and once she "gets it", we'll plant some more. (also: I think I may be losing my hair)


Other things planted today: 20 better boy tomatos, 10 cherry tomatos- I tried to get the large cherrys this time, not the tiny sweet 100s, which are good but annoying to pick, 20 bell peppers, and a bunch of lettuce (8 different kinds), spinach, basil, and oregano. Its supposed to drop down into the teens for the next few nights, but the cold shouldn't hurt the seeds before germination. After Friday, it stays in the upper 20's which is not so cold that the greenhouse can't protect them at night. I felt inside the greenhouse today when it was 45 outside and it was very warm, so I think they'll germinate ok.

We've had tons of snow this January- usually its just clear all month with an awful inversion that traps in the air pollution, but this time we've had a snowstorm at least once a week, sometimes twice. There is still at least half a foot in the back yard.



11 comments:

apyknowzitall said...

You suck. I hate the fact you and my parents can grow big juicy tomatoes every year without fail and I'm stuck with peas and carrots:(:(

Muriel said...

That greenhouse is so cool! Looks like just what we need here in Idaho. Where did you get it?

Nick said...

Lowes. But we just had a monster snowstorm that dumped 9 more inches, and blew over the greenhouse and dumped all the dirt and seeds out. I'll have to repot tomorrow.

Muriel said...

Murphy's Law.

apyknowzitall said...

Hmm, something like that happens the day after I plant seeds in the garden except with rain.

The Shark said...

And the moral of the story is: never try.

Julie C said...

So, what grows in Washington? I'm thinking of trying 4 tomato plants, but I'd like to branch out with at least one thing different. I was going to put in a growbox and try peas and beans and other stuff, but there is still so much to do inside the house that I probably won't get to that outside project this year. So I have an area about 6 square yards, on the west side of the house but at the south end - so it gets sun all afternoon.

Nick said...

Seattle is perfect for lettuce and spinach. And peas. Those are good cool weather plants that will love that spot by the house. Carrots, onions, radishes and beets will grow great there too. And don' forget some herbs- basil, oregano, parsley, cilantro would do fine there as well

apyknowzitall said...

Julie- I've really gotten into organic gardening the past couple of years and this is what's worked for me. One year I was able to get tomatoes just about as good as those in zones. It hasn't failed since. I start in about mid-march with about a gallon of Uncle Malcoms potting soil mixed with a quarter to half cup of Whitney Farm's tomatoe and veggie food. Using Hume seeds- my favorite species are Sweetie and Oregon Spring-I start some seeds in those peat or moss containers with the mix and put them in a south facing window. Don't forget to thin them out to about 2 starts per pot. When they look like the 4 inch starts at the store, get them acclimated to outside. Then mix another batch of the soil mix and put them in pots. Never put them directly in the ground. Pots are great up here because you can always move them around on a windy day or if it's raining a crapload.

Oregon spring is a great variety that was developed at OSU specific for this climate. A fun thing to do is just before your tomatoes turn red, completely stop watering them and don't pick them for at least a couple of weeks. The flavor gets super concentrated and really sweet. Good luck

apyknowzitall said...

Whoops, I meant to say zones 5-7. A good book to check out is "Carrots Love Tomatoes" it's all about companion gardening.

erin said...

Nick, you should have a gardening show on NPR that comes on right after Car Talk. It would make Saturday perfect.

Also, I can't believe how big Lucy is! And what a doll!