Sunday, May 07, 2006

Garden Journal, Week 5

The peach tree- the only tree or vine I have ever planted, untouched by the jaws of Maggy. When it started flowering this spring, we had an unexpected frost (the same that killed off my zinnia and marigold seeds. Note to self- when the weatherman says it will be 35 overnight, assume he meant 25), and most of the peach flowers were kind of burned off. Not that I care, last year it set way too much fruit, and it all ended up withering away halfway through the season since the tree could not support all of it at once. This time, I pulled off most of it and left maybe 15.

The (purple!?!) tulips are finally blooming. I swear the package said dark red. The daffodils never made it. I wonder if they'll still come up next year...

My pride and joy- the tomatos, are just starting to flower, which means in a little over a month I'll finally get to break my 7 month tomato fast. Well, I've eaten tomatos since then, but the store bought ones shouldn't even be considered tomatos. They truly are an affront to God.

Here's mister Pepper. I bought several red, and a green pepper plant, including several jalapenos, serrano, and a banana pepper plant. I don't know why they distinguish between red and green when they sell them, since they all start out green and all end up red anyway- which still doesn't explain why I claim bought 4 red and 1 green...

I'm planting a lot more squash this year since Lucy seems to like it, and Jenny found a great butternut squash soup recipe (It's REALLY good, and I don't like squash...). Zucchini too since she makes pretty good zucchini bread. That, and we really want to stuff someone's backseat with zucchini while they're in church...

I've returned to the tomatillo. I planted several at our provo house and really liked the salsa they made. I justified not planting them the last two years saying that I could just buy them at the store. Well, I never did.

The peas seem to be coming along nicely. I wonder if they'll naturally lean over and grab that fence, or if I'll have to encourage them.
The strawberries are beginning to flower. I bought a variety that says they make good fruit in their first year. Interesting though, the stems are also red... I've never seen that.

I've planted gladiolas out in the front yard garden bed that runs along the house for two years running, and it looks as though they managed to survive the winter there. (The dahlias did not survive in the regular garden though...) I can't remember what color they are. I think its a mix, but I won't find out until about July or so.
In the foreground is garlic, with a few baby spinaches, and in the background is the main bed of onions, garlic and lettuce.
Yay! My grape came back... again. Both winters now Maggie has gotten into the garden and decided she really likes to chew on grape wood. I thought both times it had died permanently, but both plants seem to be coming back.

And as our final exhibit we have....Jerusalem Artichoke. I've never grown it before, but if you've ever lived in Utah in the summer, you might remember those tall, almost sunflower type yellow flowers (but smaller) growing on the side of the road as if it were a weed. It turns out they're all jerusalem artichokes. I hear you can use them like potatos or turnips, and that they have a nice flavor. We'll see about that. I actually bought one in the middle of last summer. I thought it had died off, but lo and behold the plant had grown into two tubers, and both resumed their growth this spring. I transplanted them to a more fertile, sunny spot.





6 comments:

Jenny said...

I love Nick's sense of adventure when it comes to gardening--what color will it be? will it survive the winter? we don't know what it tastes like, and it grows like a weed--let's plant it! :)

I still dream about the tomatoes from our first garden though ... mmmm, Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes ... mmmmm ...

randy said...

I'm so jealous of your tomatoes. We had too much going on (still do) to add a garden to the list. But Heather really wants one and has promised to grow some tomatoes for me even though she can't stand them (is there any greater sign of true love?).

Nick said...

"Greater love hath no (wo)man than this, that she groweth tomatos for her husband"

Not that I'll ever live there, but Texas must be one of the best garden climates in the U.S.

erin said...

I have heard that "there's just two things that money can't buy and that's true love and home-grown tomatoes (home-grown tomatoes, home-grown tomatoes)." Sounds like you got both Randy--nice work.

(That clever little ditty is one I heard on public radio years ago, sung by what sounded like an old farmer in a bass, somewhat monotone voice. It made a deep impression.)

Jenny said...

I'm not convinced we'll never live in Texas--a long growing season and good tomato potential has a way of working on Nick. I bet five years from now he's saying "Honey, why don't we look at Texas? Or at least New Mexico?"

erin said...

Nick and Jenny, your garden has inspired me to the point of a window box garden. I don't have much yard and even less sun in that yard (tall cottonwoods everywhere), but by jingo I'm a-goin' to plant me some tomato plants in a box! Sometime I hope I'm neighbors with you again.